/Deathray
death-by-dior:

X
blastedheath:

Vieira Rodrigues (Portuguese, b. 1947), Meteor, 2013. Enamel on acrylic glass, 100 x 90 cm.

blastedheath:

Vieira Rodrigues (Portuguese, b. 1947), Meteor, 2013. Enamel on acrylic glass, 100 x 90 cm.

tsamthepoet:

The world stands with Palestine.

pikxchu:

Capillaries | by Thorsten Scheuermann
sagansense:

spaceexp:

Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt standing next to a boulder during the third EVA


#astronautsBRO

sagansense:

spaceexp:

Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt standing next to a boulder during the third EVA

#astronautsBRO

martinlkennedy:

Painting by Chris Moore from the book Dangerous Frontiers (1980)

martinlkennedy:

Painting by Chris Moore from the book Dangerous Frontiers (1980)

laboratoryequipment:

Laser Reveals Mysterious Order in Liquid HeliumAn experiment at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has revealed a well-organized 3-D grid of quantum “tornadoes” inside microscopic droplets of super-cooled liquid helium. This is the first time this formation has been seen at such a tiny scale.The findings by an international research team provide new insight on the strange nanoscale traits of a so-called “superfluid” state of liquid helium. When chilled to extremes, liquid helium behaves according to the rules of quantum mechanics that apply to matter at the smallest scales and defy the laws of classical physics. This superfluid state is one of just a few examples of quantum behavior on a large scale that makes the behavior easier to see and study.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/laser-reveals-mysterious-order-liquid-helium

laboratoryequipment:

Laser Reveals Mysterious Order in Liquid Helium

An experiment at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has revealed a well-organized 3-D grid of quantum “tornadoes” inside microscopic droplets of super-cooled liquid helium. This is the first time this formation has been seen at such a tiny scale.

The findings by an international research team provide new insight on the strange nanoscale traits of a so-called “superfluid” state of liquid helium. When chilled to extremes, liquid helium behaves according to the rules of quantum mechanics that apply to matter at the smallest scales and defy the laws of classical physics. This superfluid state is one of just a few examples of quantum behavior on a large scale that makes the behavior easier to see and study.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/laser-reveals-mysterious-order-liquid-helium